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Photography
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how do you get the camera to work properly?
GB3424
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Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015 - 07:24 PM UTC
Hi, I have a Nikon Coolpix L330 camera and it doesn't want to work properly. How do you get a crisp, clean photo with this camera? Your help would be appreciated, thanks.
varanusk
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ARMORAMA
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Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015 - 08:00 PM UTC
Hi George,
As I do not know what you are currently doing, I will start from the basics: light!

You need at least 3 strong light sources, one on top and one on each side. They should cover the whole scene. You have some good tips and light arrange example from Master Jose Luis Lopez here:

http://jllopezstyle.com/basic-tips-for-taking-pictures-of-your-kits/

Then you need a tripod, and a cable (or use the timer).

A large flat background, set the white balance on your camera and the lowest ISO you have, and you are ready to start.

Do not use the flash, and avoid the zoom also if possible. From my point of view, macro is not needed either.

You will have to experiment with different exposure compensation values (eV), or play directly with f-stops and exposure time.

If you still can not get what you want, post a couple of tests.
majjanelson
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Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015 - 08:12 PM UTC
Besides having sufficient NATURAL light as Carlos indicated, I've found that using my camera mounted on a tripod along with the camera's timer helps a great deal creating clear pictures.

You also need to learn how to use the Macro function of your camera, only zoom using the optical portion of the lens (not the digital zoom), and adjusting the aperture and shutter speed.

I've learned that for models, especially Braille Scale subjects, a shutter speed of around 1/3 of a second and an F-stop of around 8-9 works well for the light sources I have.

If you can attend a class for using digital cameras (for free), it will likely give you a great deal of insight if you haven't been using a camera much beyond "point-n-shoot".

HTH
GB3424
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Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015 - 08:18 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi George,
As I do not know what you are currently doing, I will start from the basics: light!

You need at least 3 strong light sources, one on top and one on each side. They should cover the whole scene. You have some good tips and light arrange example from Master Jose Luis Lopez here:

http://jllopezstyle.com/basic-tips-for-taking-pictures-of-your-kits/

Then you need a tripod, and a cable (or use the timer).

A large flat background, set the white balance on your camera and the lowest ISO you have, and you are ready to start.

Do not use the flash, and avoid the zoom also if possible. From my point of view, macro is not needed either.

You will have to experiment with different exposure compensation values (eV), or play directly with f-stops and exposure time.

If you still can not get what you want, post a couple of tests.



hi, that is very helpful thank you. But I have had a look on the settings of the camera and there is no option for ISO or anything else really, you can change the number of pixels being used (up to 20mp) and something called "af assist", also you can select different "scenes" but they all look the same. It's got me very confused. The main problem with the photos is they are very grainy and lack detail.
majjanelson
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Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015 - 08:42 PM UTC
George,

BLUF: your Nikon apparently doesn't allow you to make the adjustments you need to make.

You may want to look at these two reviews of your camera:

Nikon L330 REVIEW (YouTube)

Nikon Coolpix L330 Review

Good Luck!
GB3424
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Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015 - 08:42 PM UTC
Tried taking photos with a tripod and they look better all ready, thanks.
GB3424
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Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015 - 08:54 PM UTC

Quoted Text

George,

BLUF: your Nikon apparently doesn't allow you to make the adjustments you need to make.

You may want to look at these two reviews of your camera:

Nikon L330 REVIEW (YouTube)

Nikon Coolpix L330 Review

Good Luck!



Thanks for the links, using a tripod is improving the photos but they still aren't right yet I should of bought a better camera. Also can someone please explain to me some of the terms in photography, like "F-stop" and "ISO" because it's all confusing, (technology is not a strong point of mine). really appreciate the help, thanks.
RLlockie
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Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015 - 11:49 PM UTC
F stop is a measure of the size of the hole behind the lens through which the light travels to the film or sensor. Small number means more light, high number means less. A byproduct is that more is in focus with a small aperture, so generally better for model photography. F16 is a good starting point. However, less light through the hole means the shutter needs to be open for longer for the same amount of light to reach the film or sensor, so the tripod avoids blur due to your hands shaking. With some lenses I can hand hold down to around 1/15 sec but a tripod always gives better results. F stops halve the amount of light with each one as the numbers increase, from 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32 etc.. Shutter speeds do the same but are more intuitive, as the amount of time reduces with each step, e.g. 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250th etc..

ISO is a measure of the light sensitivity of the film/sensor. High number is more sensitive (so easier to use in less light) but shows more grain in the image. Again therefore, a low number gives better quality but needs large apertures or slow shutter speeds; hence the tripod.

Photography is a compromise between these three variables. Ideally for model photography I'd opt for low ISO number, small aperture (high f number) and slow shutter speed.

The principles have not changed since the days of film so there are loads of books an probably websites that explain the basics.
GB3424
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Posted: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 12:28 AM UTC

Quoted Text

F stop is a measure of the size of the hole behind the lens through which the light travels to the film or sensor. Small number means more light, high number means less. A byproduct is that more is in focus with a small aperture, so generally better for model photography. F16 is a good starting point. However, less light through the hole means the shutter needs to be open for longer for the same amount of light to reach the film or sensor, so the tripod avoids blur due to your hands shaking. With some lenses I can hand hold down to around 1/15 sec but a tripod always gives better results. F stops halve the amount of light with each one as the numbers increase, from 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32 etc.. Shutter speeds do the same but are more intuitive, as the amount of time reduces with each step, e.g. 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250th etc..

ISO is a measure of the light sensitivity of the film/sensor. High number is more sensitive (so easier to use in less light) but shows more grain in the image. Again therefore, a low number gives better quality but needs large apertures or slow shutter speeds; hence the tripod.

Photography is a compromise between these three variables. Ideally for model photography I'd opt for low ISO number, small aperture (high f number) and slow shutter speed.

The principles have not changed since the days of film so there are loads of books an probably websites that explain the basics.



Thank you very much, it makes sense now. cheers
varanusk
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ARMORAMA
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Posted: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 02:08 PM UTC
Sorry if I went too technical... I had no idea of your background so before explaining what you may already know I just went straight to the point.

If your manual is this
http://downloadcenter.nikonimglib.com/en/products/44/COOLPIX_L330.html

You can find some useful information on page 46 for exposure compensation. Use positive values (+0.6 eV for example) to get lighter images as they usually will be a bit dark with default settings.

Page 50 says something about setting ISO Sensitivity.

While the camera does not allow many manual controls, I think you can still get some decent shots with it, it's a matter of trying different options...and that needs time and work.
GB3424
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Posted: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 03:19 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Sorry if I went too technical... I had no idea of your background so before explaining what you may already know I just went straight to the point.

If your manual is this
http://downloadcenter.nikonimglib.com/en/products/44/COOLPIX_L330.html

You can find some useful information on page 46 for exposure compensation. Use positive values (+0.6 eV for example) to get lighter images as they usually will be a bit dark with default settings.

Page 50 says something about setting ISO Sensitivity.

While the camera does not allow many manual controls, I think you can still get some decent shots with it, it's a matter of trying different options...and that needs time and work.



No need to apologise, your comments were very helpful and thanks for the link for the manual, your help is greatly appreciated.
mmeier
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Posted: Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 01:31 AM UTC
Could you put some pictures in the gallery or on a photo hoster? Some "problem" pictures and a few of your set up? That way we could take a look and maybe get some more information. Maybe add the data (f-stop, iso, time etc) in a comment (Not sure if those data is available in the picture itself in your cameras case)


The camera itself sounds quite capabel and should be more than up to the task with good sensors and rather fast lens. Granted, a Canon would make far better pictures with the lenscap on, batteries removed and the room totally dark. But still, a fine camera (for a Nikon)

GB3424
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Posted: Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 03:11 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Could you put some pictures in the gallery or on a photo hoster? Some "problem" pictures and a few of your set up? That way we could take a look and maybe get some more information. Maybe add the data (f-stop, iso, time etc) in a comment (Not sure if those data is available in the picture itself in your cameras case)


The camera itself sounds quite capabel and should be more than up to the task with good sensors and rather fast lens. Granted, a Canon would make far better pictures with the lenscap on, batteries removed and the room totally dark. But still, a fine camera (for a Nikon)




Hi, thanks for the comments, I don't know how to post photos on this sorry, but the ISO and all that jazz can be changed on the camera, but not in menu first you have to select auto and then menu (nothing is ever simple). A Canon would of been a better choice, never mind as you say the Nikon is still an ok camera. Just need to experiment with it a bit.
GB3424
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Posted: Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 03:12 PM UTC
Thank you all for your help and merry Christmas.
Taylortony
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Posted: Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 04:55 PM UTC
I also notice your camera has lens shift vibration compensation, if you are using it on a tripod, you want to turn that off if you can, as the way it works it counteracts any shake by causing an opposite reaction, as it is fixed on the tripod it will be trying to compensate for the shake it creates by creating more
GB3424
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Posted: Wednesday, June 01, 2016 - 12:52 PM UTC
Hi, Tony
Sorry I haven't responded until now, didn't see your comment until a minute ago, the camera has a setting called "vibration reduction" which(I'm guessing) is the same as what you were saying and I've turned it off, I've played around with other settings and it's working beautifully. Thanks you for mentioning the vibration thing, I didn't even know it had that feature.