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Tips & Tricks
Ask about and post about tips and tricks you use while modelling.
Ejector pin filling?
drabslab
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European Union
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Posted: Thursday, April 05, 2018 - 01:10 PM UTC
A nch and Die set works miracles for me
mogdude
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Posted: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - 04:55 AM UTC
I will vouch for the punched disk method quick and painless
retiredyank
#160
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Posted: Monday, March 19, 2018 - 04:22 AM UTC
The advantage to using Bondo is, it's cheap and works. It is a little more time consuming, but only takes a few tries to master. Using a trowel to remove the excess putty practically eliminates dimples and clean up is quick and easy. If you want a faster cure time, using a solvent-based putty(such as Squadron or Tamiya) is your huckleberry. The problem I have, with Tamiya is that it shrinks, leaving dimples. Squadron is less prone to this, but may require more sanding.
kevinekstrom
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Posted: Monday, March 19, 2018 - 01:32 AM UTC
I use CA and it works extremely well for every pin hole I have filled. If the hole is extra big I will add some styrene to the hole secure with CA. I have never had a problem with this technique.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 08:01 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

It is glazing putty. I never really paid attention, as my dad gave me a half used tube of it eight years ago. A full tube should last a lifetime.



Thanks, saw some tonite at Wally World about $7 for a tube almost the size of a tube of toothpaste.



Careful, some glazing putties are acetone based which can attack plastic. I just use standard red Bondo in a large tube that I buy at my Napa auto parts store. However, When I can use it, I prefer Robin's styrene punch method since it's less messy and quicker than using putty. I have the same punch set depicted (found at Micro-Mark) which has the exact diameter punch for about 80% of the ejector mold marks I've found in most kits. When I'm punching out disks, I always do a few "extras", and toss them into an old pill bottle I keep in my hobby drawer. That way I have a supply of them if I don't want to pull out the punch. Simply place them, run some Tamiya thin cement around them, wait a few minutes, then give them a quick brush with a sanding stick and you're done! Using putty usually leaves a lot of residue around the ejector mark which has to be removed, and you have to wait for quite a while for the putty to cure. With styrene disks you don't have to worry about an uneven "fill" that will leave a dimple.
VR, Russ
Scarred
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Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 05:48 PM UTC

Quoted Text

It is glazing putty. I never really paid attention, as my dad gave me a half used tube of it eight years ago. A full tube should last a lifetime.



Thanks, saw some tonite at Wally World about $7 for a tube almost the size of a tube of toothpaste.
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 05:45 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Robin's method is quite interesting. I might give it a try, but instead of styrene sheets, I might cut a thin part of sprue and use that instead.

Alternatively, liquid putty.....



The problem with sprues is that they do not always have a circular cross section but the pin marks are circles ...
Cutting discs from sprue usually results in curved "chips".
Using sprue for filling large holes is another matter, the large "flags" with company names et.c. on some sprues are really useful to blank of a hole from the inside.

Styrene sheet exists in other forms than those bought for bundles of cash in the hobby shops, many food containers are made of vacuum formed styrene. In Europe all packaging shall have a marking to show which material it is (for materials reuse/recirculation) and the codes for styrene are PS or the number 6 in a triangle.
After a while one learns to recognise the "feel" of styrene, if it glues with your favourite model glue then it will work.

/ Robin


PRH001
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Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 05:23 PM UTC
For very deep ejector pin marks, I tend to use Mr Hobby’s Mr Dissolved Putty. One or two applications and sanding usually does the trick.

For shallow ejector pin marks, I use a no.10 scalpel or x acto blade to carefully scrape the mark away. A few swipes from one direction, turn 90 degrees and a few more swipes removes the evidence. A light sanding of the area, to normalize the surface, and I’m done.

It took way longer to type this on my iPad than to remove a pin mark using this method. Just remember light touch is the key as gouges will have to be filled.

Hope this helps,
Paul H
TheLilPeashooter
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Hong Kong S.A.R. / 繁體
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Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 05:22 PM UTC
Robin's method is quite interesting. I might give it a try, but instead of styrene sheets, I might cut a thin part of sprue and use that instead.

Alternatively, liquid putty.....
Anmoga
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Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 03:43 PM UTC
Try Mr. Surfacer 500.

The advantage over Tamiya's putty is that when you sand it it will keep sticking to plastic instead of getting off.

Besides it is already liquid and you fill in, wait until it is dried and if it swrinks too much you can add another layer.

In Spain I've been told to use Vallejo's putty. You can dissolve it in water so you add it, wait it to dry and with a wet earbud you even the surface. I think AK Interactive makes now something similar.
retiredyank
#160
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Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 08:46 PM UTC
It is glazing putty. I never really paid attention, as my dad gave me a half used tube of it eight years ago. A full tube should last a lifetime.
Scarred
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Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 02:44 PM UTC
Never tried it, I usually thin down squadron putty with liquid cement and build up thin layers. Think I'll give the bondo a try but I had always thought it was too hot to use on styrene. Live and learn.

EDIT that should read Bondo not Bonod
retiredyank
#160
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Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 02:35 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I use Bondo auto body filler, the edge of a flat card drug over the filled pin mark and sand smooth. Depending on the size of the ejector pin, it should be cured enough to sand ~1hr.



Are you using Bonod or Bondo Glazing Putty?



Bondo, I believe.
Scarred
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Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 11:36 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I use Bondo auto body filler, the edge of a flat card drug over the filled pin mark and sand smooth. Depending on the size of the ejector pin, it should be cured enough to sand ~1hr.



Are you using Bonod or Bondo Glazing Putty?
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 01:39 AM UTC
Punch and Die set.
I bought one of these sets for other reasons and one of the circular punches has the same diameter as the ejector pins.
Punch out small discs from sheet styrene and glue into the ejector pin hole. File smooth when glue has dried/hardened.
Much easier than messing around with putty. Measure the diameter of the ejector pin marks and use Google to find different sets and check for one that has a punch of the needed diameter

One example:

https://www.micromark.com/Micro-Punch-Set
This is not the set that I bought, mine also has hexagonal punches
/ Robin
retiredyank
#160
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Posted: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - 07:56 PM UTC
I use Bondo auto body filler, the edge of a flat card drug over the filled pin mark and sand smooth. Depending on the size of the ejector pin, it should be cured enough to sand ~1hr.
TheLilPeashooter
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Posted: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - 07:17 PM UTC
Anyone got a wunderwaffe on deals with these lil holes? I've tried filling them with unthinned Tamiya white putty, thinned white putty and, recently, superglue. Results? A mess. The unthinned putty got everywhere, the thinned putty took forever to fill and the superglue glued my fingers.